Elizabeth and Margaret have been friends for a lifetime. Now as elderly roommates and best friends these women live a simple life. When they start to reminisce about the days when they met each other and how their friendship came to be we see a totally different side of both of them. Elizabeth was responsible for escorting Margaret, an African American student around her high school in it’s attempt to integrate. They were not friends and they did not like each other but on the morning of Margaret’s first day of school when Elizabeth arrives late Margaret is met by a group of people who do not want to see her walk into the high school. She is beaten and set on fire before Elizabeth arrives to save her. From that moment on Elizabeth never left her side again. So much so that the women were able to become friends and move past the color lines.
 

Duo/ Duet- Living Past Color Lines

$60.00Price
  • (Scene opens with Elizabeth, a white elderly woman and Margaret, a black elderly woman are preparing for a walk.) Elizabeth: Come on now Margie if we don’t get out there before the sun rises we’re not going to make it before the Mississippi heat hits. We have to make it to our corner. Margaret: (Laughing) Now you know I do not do the heat. You got the tape player set to go? Elizabeth: I know, I know (Mimicking) “Chocolate melts in the heat.” And Johnny is always ready. Margaret: Well you use to say that sugar… umm sugar… what was it you use to say about sugar? My grand daughter showed me this thing on the computer where you can buy music and put it on a little square music-playing thing. She said she could make me a play (Beat, thinks of the word) a play-list. Elizabeth: A playlist you say? These kids and all their gadgets I prefer to hold on to what works. (She takes out her tape payer, puts the headphones on and presses play. She does a little dance, and begins to sing Johnny B. Good.) Margaret: (Singing) Go, go! Go Elizabeth go go. Lizzie be good! (Laughs) Dance it, sing it (Elizabeth offers her hand to Margaret and they dance as Elizabeth sings.) oh my goodness with all this work, do we really need to walk today? Elizabeth: Yes. Some things never change. What did I use to say about sugar? I can’t even think back that far. It was a different time. Margaret: We were different people. Elizabeth: I’m glad you forgave me. Margaret: I’m glad you befriended me. Elizabeth: I didn’t want to.

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