In the midst of the early 1960’s Vernon is an African American boy and his best friend Peter is a Caucasian boy that meet each other at the age of seven in the woods that connect their houses that are miles apart from each other. The boys become fast friends with them teaching each other things about their lives that the other would never know. Unfortunately Peter was born with kidneys that were never fully functioning and as h e gets older his kidneys get weaker. Vernon wants nothing more than to save the life of his friend by giving him a kidney and this is when Peter has to tell him that they are too different and that his father would never allow Vernon to give him his kidney even if it were possible. Eventually as teenagers Peter is close to death and Vernon arrives at his house to tell his father what a great son he has. It is in this moment that every fear the boys had had all of their friendship comes true. The moment that Vernon stands up for what is and will always be right, the right to love your best friend and be by his side as he dies. This right is taken away from him, but when both boys finally meet up again they are just as they had always been, friends for life.

Duo/Duet- From Friendship To Brotherhood

$60.00Price
  • (Scene opens with Vernon, a seven-year-old African American boy playing catch in the backwoods of his house. He is playing alone and having a great time. Vernon doesn’t see Peter but he is watching him the entire time.) Vernon: (Singing) “I ain’t gonna be a boy for long cause I’m gonna be a man. I’m gonna be a man one day. I’m gonna be a man.” (He laughs, Peter laughs. Vernon is startled and he begins to leave immediately.) Peter: Wait where are you going? Vernon: Away. Peter: I see that but why? Vernon: Because you white. Peter: So. Vernon: My momma told me to be careful. She said that I am a negro child and because I am a negro child I am different than other children. She said that I can not do things like the white boys can. “You a black boy Vernon. And you must live your life like one.” Peter: (Laughing) Who are you talking bout? My momma never told me that. Vernon: Well you ain’t black is you? Peter: No, but what does that matter? (Vernon laughs) Vernon: You white boys don’t know nothing. Peter: I know that you can’t throw that ball none. Vernon: Oh I can’t? Peter: No. I bet if I stood over there you couldn’t even reach me, I bet. Vernon: What do I win? Peter: Well I ain’t got no money. Vernon: I don’t want none of yo money. Peter: (Thinks) Well you out here playing by yourself, what if I bet that if you make it I’ll (Beat) I’ll be your friend. Vernon: (Beat) I don’t know if that’s a good idea, my momma said- Peter: (Mocking) “…I am different than other children…I cannot do things like the white boys can.” (They both laugh) Well maybe this is something we can do together. Meet in the woods and just play. (Vernon doesn’t answer. He gestures for Peter to step back and prepare for the throw. Peter does-) Mom: (V.O.) Vernon come on in this house it’s time for supper. (Vernon and Peter both freeze for a moment.) Vernon: Yes ma’am, I’m coming. (Vernon preps and throws, Peter catches it with ease.)

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